DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGY FACULTY PROFILE
RESEARCH MICHAEL C. CAMPBELL PUBLICATIONS
 

Contact Information
E-mail: michael.campbell1@howard.edu
Office Location: EE Just Hall Room 306
Laboratory Location: EE Just Hall Room 340
Google Scholar Link: Michael C. Campbell


Education
B.Sc., University of Toronto
M.Sc. University of Oxford
M.Phil., Columbia University
Ph.D., Columbia University

Courses
Genetics (BIOL200)
Evolutionary Medicine (BIOL417)
Directed Readings for Jrs (BIOL318)

Research Interests
African genomic diversity
Genetic basis of complex traits in human populations
Complex disease disparities in African Americans

Laboratory Personnel
Jayla Harvey (Biology)
NaTazah O’Neil (Biology)
Anaya Russell (Biology)
Melchisedek Leo (Allied Health)

Research Detailed

While there have been advances in the management of complex diseases, such as hypertension and certain types of cancer, in general significant disparities among patient populations still remain. For example, prostate mortality rate is much higher for African American men than for men of European descent. Additionally, population surveys in the US from early in the last century have consistently documented higher blood pressures and related cardiovascular in African Americans compared to individuals of European ancestry. Despite these striking trends, little is known about the genetic and/or environmental factors underlying the increased risk for some complex diseases in individuals of African descent. To address this gap in knowledge, one of the major goals of the Campbell lab is to understand the genetic basis of complex diseases (for example, prostate cancer, prostate cancer and hypertension) that disproportionately affect African and African American populations using wet laboratory and computational methods. In the end, we aim to generate new information regarding the distribution and frequency of variants specific to populations of African descent, which will be informative for the development of targeted treatments based on more personalized genomic variation.

Selected Publications

  Campbell, M.C., JB Hirbo, JP Townsend and S.A. Tishkoff (2014) The Peopling of the African continent and the Diaspora into the New World, Current Opinion in Genetics and Development 29: 120-132.
  Campbell, M.C., A. Ranciaro, D. Zinshteyn, R. Rawlings-Goss, J.B. Hirbo, S.I.Thompson, D. Woldemeskel, A. Froment, S.A. Omar, J.-M. Bodo, T. Nyambo, G. Belay, D. Drayna, P. A. S. Breslin, and S.A. Tishkoff (2014) Limited Evidence for Adaptive Evolution and Functional Effect of Allelic Variation at rs702424 in the Promoter of the TAS2R16 Bitter Taste Gene in Africa. Journal of Human Genetics 59: 349-352
  Ranciaro, A., M.C. Campbell, J.B. Hirbo, W.-Y. Ko, A. Froment, G. Destro-Bisol, M.J. Kotze, M. Ibrahim, T. Nyambo, S.A. Omar, S.A. Tishkoff (2014) Genetic Origins of Lactase Persistence and the Spread of Pastoralism in Africa. American Journal of Human Genetics 94 (4): 496-510.
  Rawlings-Goss, R.A., M.C. Campbell, and S.A. Tishkoff (2014) Global Population-Specific Variation in miRNA Associated with Cancer Risk and Clinical Biomarkers, BMC Medical Genomics 7: 53.
  Campbell, M.C., A. Ranciaro, D. Zinshteyn, R. Rawlings-Goss, J.B. Hirbo, S.I.Thompson, D. Woldemeskel, A. Froment, J.B. Rucker, S.A. Omar, J.-M. Bodo, T. Nyambo, G. Belay, D. Drayna, P. A. S. Breslin, and S.A. Tishkoff (2014) Origin and Differential Selection of Allelic Variation at TAS2R16 Associated with Salicin Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa. Molecular Biology and Evolution, 31 (2): 288-302.
  Campbell, M.C., A. Ranciaro, A. Froment, J. Hirbo, S. Omar, J.-M. Bodo, T. Nyambo, G. Lema, D. Zinshteyn, D. Drayna, P.A.S. Breslin, and S.A. Tishkoff (2012) Evolution of Functionally Diverse Alleles Associated with PTC Bitter Taste Sensitivity in Africa. Molecular Biology and Evolution 29(4): 1141-1153.
  Campbell, M.C. and S.A. Tishkoff (2010) The Evolution of Human Genetic and Phenotypic Variation in Africa. Current Biology 20 (4): R166-173.
  Campbell, M.C. and S.A. Tishkoff (2008) African Genetic Diversity: Implications for Human Demographic History, Modern Human Origins and Complex Disease Mapping. Annual Review of Genomics and Human Genetics 9:403-433